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Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Black Out: Dress Rehearsal for the Revolution

Kenneth Goff warns about the potential race riots predicted in a Communist manual.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Document and Material on the Child Development Group of Mississippi

This series of documents and materials on the Child Development Group of Mississippi contains multiple sections. Section One contains six letters, one telegram and one newspaper article praising the efforts of the CDGM and its staff.

I Have A Dream

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

I Have A Dream

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Let's Be Human

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter from Alice Brainerd to MLK

Ms. Brainerd criticizes the methods of Dr. King, asserting that "civil disobedience and non-cooperation" are not the best approach to take towards justice.

Letter from Alice Peterson to MLK

Peterson writes Dr. King with her predictions and shares her past accomplishments and future plans.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Congressman Donald M. Fraser to MLK

Minnesota Democratic Congressman Donald Fraser asks Dr. King to serve on the advisory board of the National Committee on Tithing in Investment (NCTI). Fraser reports recent successes in the area of open occupancy housing, such as a project in Boston that rehabilitates homes for low-income families, and a project in Denver that raises seed capital for "integrated cooperatives and other housing ventures."

Letter from Constance A. Price to David J. Hahn

Constance Price informs David Hahn, Colorado State Senator, of how she has suffered for the past twelve years due to the violation of her constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Workman's Compensation Act of Colorado.

Letter from Constance A. Price to MLK

In this letter, Ms. Price writes to Dr. King to request that he makes mention of the blatant injustices committed by the State of Colorado, to its citizens, during the "poor people's campaign" in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Letter from Fred Sondermann to MLK

Mr. Sondermann invites Dr. King on behalf of Colorado College to speak at their annual symposium. Mr. Sondermann discusses this important tradition and explains the upcoming topic.

Letter from H. Carl Moultrie to MLK

H. Carl Moultrie invites Dr. King or another representative to participate in a panel discussion as a part of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity's Annual Grand Conclave. Moultrie also provides brief information about the fraternity.

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Evans

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for Dr. Evans' contribution to the SCLC. He goes on to state the importance of the supporters contribution, so that the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.

Letter from MLK to Asbury Howard

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Howard for a recent letter which informed him of a proposed merger of labor unions.

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Letter from Phillip O. Foss to MLK

Phillip O. Foss requests permission to use excerpts from "Letter from Birmingham Jail".

Letter from T. M. Benson to MLK

A representative from Peak Publications requests Dr. King's permission to use a portion of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract concerning racial issues and the church. The sender offers a hundred dollars for permission to reprint this section.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Letter to MLK from A. P. Swiderskas

Mr. Swiderskas writes to Dr. King expressing his general hatered of the black race.

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

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