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In Memoriam MLK: New York Times

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This newspaper clipping is one of several full-page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings by the NAACP accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the organization to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Letter from Paul Rene of KYAC to MLk

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Paul Rene, the Public Relations Director and News Editor of KYAC Radio requests to interview Dr. King on voter registration.

Thursday, May 26, 1966

Letter from Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation

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Hector G. Trout, Assistant Secretary of the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, expresses interest in Dr. King speaking at their teachers' convention.

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Letter from John A. Collison to MLK

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John Collision writes Dr. King regarding race relations in America. Collision wants Dr. King to understand that majority of whites have no hatred toward blacks, but instead "a strangeness" and questioning of why people are different shades.

Saturday, August 15, 1964

If I were a Negro

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Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

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In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Sunday, March 31, 1968

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

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Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones of Morehouse College, asking him to translate the enclosed letter for Dr. King.

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

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This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

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Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

The Free Southern Theater

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

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Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

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Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Telegram from Dr. Richard Moore to MLK

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Dr. Richard Moore, on behalf of Bethune Cookman College, expresses support for Dr. King during the SCLC Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Letter from Betty White to Coretta Scott King

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Betty White, president of The Young Matrons of True Light Baptist Church, invites Mrs. King to be a guest speaker and soloist at an upcoming civil rights program.

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Appreciation Letter from MLK to Maitland Griggs

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Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Maitland Griggs contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Thursday, January 10, 1963

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

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Tuesday, August 30, 1966

Excerpts of Letters Written About Vietnam War

This document includes excerpts from letters written by Mary Agnes Blonien, sister of an American nurse at the Minh Quy Hospital at Kontum, South Vietnam. Moved to the point of tears, the nurse shares her thoughts and gives a vivid account of the war conditions in Vietnam, and expresses empathy for both Americans and Vietnamese.

Letter from Ludwig Meyer to MLK

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Ludwig Meyer, Chairman of the Frankford Friends Meeting's Forum Committee, invites Dr. King to speak at his organization. Meyer states that if the date of the event is not convenient, he would like Coretta Scott King to be present.

Friday, July 30, 1965

Letter from Ralph Turnidge to MLK

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The Reverend Ralph Turnidge, General Secretary of the Washington-Northern Idaho Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to be the featured leader at a conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Friday, January 24, 1964

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

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Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Cognition

This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

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James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

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Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Negotiation Now New York Times Advertisement

Negotiation Now, a national pro-American group opposing the war in Vietnam, planned to publish this article as an advertisement in the New York Times. Clark Herr, Reverend John J. Dougherty, Dr. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Seymour Martin Lipset send this letter, along with an enclosed draft of the piece, explaining that its publishing has been delayed so it can be updated in the ever changing circumstances in Vietnam. The article addresses the concerns of the movement and urges people to call their representatives.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

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Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

Science

Dr. King's notecard addresses the analytical method of science. King interprets Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" to mean "[t]he method of science is to diversify or break up this experience into its component elements." He quotes Whitehead coining the term 'diversification of nature.'

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

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Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Friday, April 7, 1967

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