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I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Memorandum from SCLC Personnel Committee to the Steering Committee

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SCLC's Personnel Committee conducts a meeting to review the release of William Whitsett from Department of Information. The meeting resulted in the committee's unanimous decision to send a list of recommendations for the Steering Committee to review.

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

Letter from Flournoy Coles to MLK

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Flournoy Coles invites Dr. King to come to Fisk University and lead a session of the Honors Program.

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Elias About Civil Rights March

In this correspondence, Dr. King thanks Mr. Elias for a previously sent letter. He goes on to mention that the Southern Christian Leadership Conference is presently organizing in Chicago, with the goal of eventually launching a major campaign.

Letter from Edouard Theis to MLK

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Mr. Theis makes reference of having spoke to a French group of non-violent Christians about Dr. King's struggle for freedom. Mr. Theis suggests a reproduction of "Letter From The Birmingham Jail" as well as the distribution of the French translation as a chapter in a French Nonviolent Action book.

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

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FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Monday, March 29, 1965

Letter from James Eby to MLK

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Eby invites Dr.King to speak at Miami University due to "student interest in civil rights."

Monday, October 5, 1964

Schleiermacher

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher's views on religion, sin and redemption.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

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Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Friday, February 5, 1965

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Letter from Ehru E. Hart to SCLC

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Hart sends commendations to Dr. King after hearing him speak, and requests copies of the speech.

Wednesday, April 6, 1966

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

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Peggy Duff writes Dr. King on behalf of The Campaign for Disarmament in West Germany to request a meeting with him while he is London. Ms. Duff references an earlier meeting with Dr. King in which he mentioned a projected trip to Europe in order to receive an Honorary Degree at Newcastle University. She informs him that the organization is interested in having him speak at a meeting on the war in Vietnam.

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

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This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

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After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

Saturday, May 30, 1964

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

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Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Friday, August 9, 1963

Letter from Larry M. Otter & Alan Aftanski to MLK

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Mount Saint Mary's College's Young Democratic and Young Republican Clubs inform Dr. King of their preparation for the National Collegiate Primary, Choice '68. Dr. King has been named a candidate in the mock election, so the organizers request information about his views. They also tell Dr. King that a speaking engagement can be arranged if Dr. King's schedule brings him to the Maryland area.

Monday, March 25, 1968

Dr. Spock, Dr. King and Rev. Rice Marching Down 5th Ave. NYC. April 15, 1967

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This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Saturday, April 15, 1967

Justice

Dr. King provides his views regarding the concept of justice.

Exam for Bible 252 at Morehouse

This is an exam for Dr. King's Bible course, which lasted from September 1946 to May 1947, at Morehouse College. Dr. George D. Kelsey was the professor. Dr. King's notes are in the margins.

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

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Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."

Monday, January 31, 1966

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

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Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

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Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Sunday, September 15, 1963

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Dr. King-Notecard

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

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Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Holiday Card from Alvino and Betty Figueroa to the King Family

This seasonal greeting card and wedding photograph was sent to Mrs. Coretta Scott King and family. Affectionately addressed to "Corrie," the card provides an update on the couple's employment and future plans. The couple also thanks Mrs. King for the picture she sent of her "two lovely children" last holiday season.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

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The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Monday, February 19, 1968

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