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Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

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Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Friday, April 5, 1968

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

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J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Telegram to MLK from 347 AFL-CIO Armours Lard Refinery Workers

The Local 347 of the AFL-CIO sent this Western Union Telegram to Dr. King as an expression of their hopes for his recovery, during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

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In this letter, dated March 9, 1965, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays requests Dr. King's attendance at the annual Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting.

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

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Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

Tuesday, March 3, 1964

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

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In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Thursday, January 11, 1968

Stride Towards Freedom Royalties

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This document serves as a financial receipt from Laurence Pollinger Ltd. Royalties for Dr. King's book Stride Towards Freedom are included in the statement.

Sunday, July 25, 1965

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

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Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Letter from Louise Boyer to Mrs. Arthur Logan

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Louise Boyer writes on behalf of Governor Nelson Rockefeller informing Mrs. Arthur Logan that a contribution check is enclosed for the SCLC.

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

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Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

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This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Monday, August 29, 1966

Royalty Statement: Why We Can't Wait

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This royalty statement details Dr. King's earnings for the book "Why We Can't Wait" over a six month period.

Monday, April 3, 1967

Telegram from J.C. Willimas and George Moore to the National Education Association of America

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Mr. Williams writes to the National Education Association of America requesting an immediate investigation take place on behalf of the Atlanta School System. He suggests that discriminatory practices are present.

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

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Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

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Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King for afternoon tea to discuss ongoing issues in Deerfield, Illinois with Rev. Bletzer and members of the American Freedom of Residence Fund.

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

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Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Saturday, June 26, 1965

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

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This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

Monday, September 19, 1966

Telegram from Trinity Cathedral to MLK

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Members of Trinity Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey offer their support to Dr. King and others "who are endangering your lives for the sake of others." Dr. King received this telegram in the midst of the desegregation campaign in Birmingham, 1963.

Friday, May 24, 1963

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

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Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Friday, May 20, 1966

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. White

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. White for considering him to be on Per Se Advisory Board, but due to a busy schedule Dr. King declines his offer.

Letter from MLK to Zelma George

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Dr. King thanks Zelma George and her husband for their hospitality while he visited Cleveland.

Wednesday, November 6, 1963

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

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Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Letter from C. L. Evans to MLK

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C. L. Evans is giving a $100 contribution on behalf of the Baptist Allied Headquarters, to Dr. King for his work and organization.

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Letter from Diane M. Monk to Dora McDonald

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Ms. Monk, a student, thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance with a school report. Monk also suggests that other students be instructed to read Dr. King's books, particularly "Stride for Freedom," for valuable information.

Friday, August 16, 1963

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

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Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

Friday, March 26, 1965

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

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John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

Monday, October 7, 1963

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